Must-Reads, Professional Development, School Design

BOMish: July 2018

book-of-the-month (1)

How’s that personal professional development going, friends?

In the midst of my final days of graduate school, in which I want nothing more than to sleep and eat an unsafe amount of chocolate truffles, I’m still keeping the practice of reading.

I’ll admit– I’m cheating a bit this month.

This month’s BOMish was one of my choice-books for my final class. Nevertheless, it’s a book! A compelling one, at that, rife with lessons I’ll take with me, and another chance to walk my walk and keep reading for my own sake.

The NEW School Rules: 6 Vital Practices for Thriving and Responsive Schools (Anthony Kim & Alexis Gonzalez-Black)

ISBN
Photo from newschoolrules.com
  • The Stats: 216 Pages, published February 2018
  • Who Should Read It: School administrators, school designers
  • My Rating (out of 5 ♥): ♥♥♥.5
  • My Thoughts: If you’ve ever found yourself checking the clock during a faculty meeting, willing the seconds to propel forward as you listen to an unproductive argument rooted in excuses and unnecessary power dynamics, this book is a breath of hope. If you’ve ever been on the receiving end of a strategic plan that seems impractical, patronizing, and woefully inappropriate, this book shows the light! 

The New School Rules offers six practices that help improve school structure, design, and overall effectiveness from an administrative perspective. The practices (Planning, Teaming, Managing Roles, Decision-Making, Sharing Information, and Learning Organization) are research-based strategies and are presented alongside realistic case studies, which include the problems, the learning, and helpful resources. The website is the perfect companion to the book and offers a rich supply of tools, workouts, and exercises for applying the rules in real-time.

I found myself nodding along several times in this book and having a few “aha!” moments, such as when planning, start small and plan for pivot-points. Or reinventing meeting structures, whereby most of the preparation is done by individuals before the meeting, rather than spending time listening to the moderator review the entire schedule.

Along with some aggressive head-nodding, I also left the book wondering how well certain ideas would work in a school, as they smelled more of a non-profit or start-up flavor, than that of an education setting. In a school setting, the majority of roles are already pre-assigned at the time of hiring. For instance, if I’m hired to be a middle school teacher, the bulk of my job will be… teaching middle school. The additional roles will generally be ancillary, and I’m curious how the Managing Roles and Teaming strategies will be received and/or adapted by school leaders as this book finds itself in schools. 

Ultimately, I’m curious about the reception of this book and its practicality and application to schools. I left it abuzz with ideas but also with equal measure of questions of its depth of relevancy to a school. The rules and simplification found on the website are dangerously tempting to be used as quickie (easily forgotten) professional development sessions and not for grander structural overhauls– which the book suggests are necessary for a school to be more responsive. 

Certainly worth a read, and I look forward to seeing further versions, adaptations, and ideas as schools take it on.

Have you read The New School Rules? 

Are these rules appropriate for your school setting? 

What rule do you think is most important for your school? Least?